Designing Websites for Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation

TESOL 2001 Pre-convention Institute

 

Sharon Widmayer

Holly Gray

At the end of the session you will have:

q a plan for an instructional website

q guidelines on effective websites

q examples of how to use the web for listening & speaking

q guidelines for using sound and video on the web

q an understanding of the technology that you will need to download or buy, skills you need to learn, time it will take

A note about this session

Today we are focusing on the planning and design of great listening and speaking web sites.  This is not a “how to use an HTML editor” session. 

Learning how to make a web page is the easy part.  Learning how to make a good web page is what we will cover.

Step 1 – How can you use the Internet for listening and speaking?

Why would I want to use the Internet for teaching pronunciation?

q  highly motivating atmosphere

q  students can work on their own or in a lab

q  students can work at their own pace

q  audio & video clips can be played more than once

q  a vast array of timely, authentic materials is available

q  students can hear a wide variety of English

q   introduces students to valuable technology skills

What activities can we do?

Listening

q Listen to/watch material created for the ESL Learner

q Listen to/watch authentic material

q  Listen for specific purposes (a springboard for other skills)

Speaking

q   Visit sites for the ESL learner to study and practice

q   Visit authentic sites for discovery activities

q   Make recordings and post them on a web page

Sample Activities

q Listening & Speaking

q News Web Quest

q Listening & Pronunciation

q Haiku

q Word endings

q Limericks

 

q Grammar

q listening for tense

q listening for word endings

Step 2- Deciding on your web site goals

Content learning goals

q What are your class objectives?

q What are your students’ personal goals?

q Do students have to pass  there any sort of departmental evaluation or  exam?

Technology learning goals

q How can you add real value to your class?

q  Will the technology you choose improve an aspect of the course?

q Are you concerned with students accessing technology (reading or listening to a web page) or creating a product using technology (making a web page, making PowerPoint slides, etc)?

 

Matching objectives to appropriate technology

q Remember, your choice of technology should be based on your learning goals, not vice-versa.

Knowing your audience

q Are your students familiar with “surfing the Internet”?

 

q How much time outside of class do you expect students to be able to work on technology-related projects?

 

q Are you assuming that most of your students have home computers?

 

q  What technology skills are you assuming that your students already have?

Technology resources (including free software)

q See handout

Personnel resources

q Your time

q Your support

q Student helpers

q IT Support

q Instructional Design Support

q Campus technology workshops

Considerations when digitizing audio and video

q Copyright

q Quality vs. file size and download time

q Format

q Audience’s technology

q Security

q Multimedia applications

Step 3 - Make a Plan

Flow charting

q  Make a list of things you want on your website

q  Syllabi

q  Activities

q  Links

q  Multimedia clips

q  Worksheets

q  Group

q  Make a flow chart of how these things should be linked

 

Example Flowchart

Step 4 - Development and Implementation Considerations

Interface/Web Design

q Navigation

q Layout

q Colors

q Font

q Images

Accessibility

q Alternative formats

q Alt tags

q Bobby http://www.cast.org/bobby/

Storyboards

q Pictures of your web page

q Notes about

q Learning goals

q Navigation

q multimedia

Sample Storyboard

Effective instructional website criteria

Based on Khan, B. and Vega, R. (1997) "Factors to Consider When Evaluating Web-based Instruction Course: A Survey." In B. Khan (Ed) Web-based Instruction. New Jersey: Educational Technologies Publications.

 

 Layout

q Consistent navigation

q Clear layout that makes it easy to access the information you

q Relevant links

q Information on each page limited to a reasonable amount

Pedagogy

q  Clear objectives

q  Use of the web consistent with the objectives

q  Students receive feedback

q  Access to the instructor provided

q  Student usage followed (by computer or teacher)

q  Course content accurate, interesting and engaging

q  Different learning styles addressed

 Navigation and organization:

 

q Simple, clear consistent navigation

q Clear organization

q Structure of site helps students discern the relevance of information

Accessibility

q Clear language

q Lowest common denominator technology

q Student technical support

q The material is easy to access (loading speed, technology needed, availability of lab time,etc.)

q Alternative formats provided when possible

 Other

q Is there an opportunity for students to provide feedback on the website?

q Does the course take advantage of the capabilities of the technology?

q Is security for the website adequate?

 

Step 5 - Sharing Your Design & Plans

q Participants share ideas and critique each others plans in small groups and discuss potential stumbling blocks with the facilitators

Thanks for coming     

Holly Gray

Anne Arudel Community College

hdgray@ mail.aacc.cc.md.us

http://www2.aacc.cc.md.us/eslhdgray/main/Default.htm

q    

Sharon Alayne Widmayer

George Washington University

swidmaye@gwu.edu

http://gwis2.circ.gwu.edu/~swidmaye